TNT: Jim Wallis, the Church and the World

In this episode: Tripp talks with Jim Wallis about the Common Good and being on God’s side, then Bo and Callid chat about the church and the world.Wallis

The four books that come up in this episode are:

On God’s Side: What Religion Forgets and Politics Hasn’t Learned about Serving the Common Good by Jim Wallis

The Argument Culture: Stopping America’s War of Words by Deborah Tannen

The Peaceable Kingdom: A Primer In Christian Ethics by Stanley Hauerwas

Rethinking Christ and Culture: A Post-Christendom Perspective by Craig A. Carter

 

 Let your voice be heard! Go to the ‘speak-pipe’ on the home page and let us know what you think about ‘the church and the world’ – we will use it on the TNT in 2 weeks.

 

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If you enjoy all the Homebrewed Christianity Podcasts then consider sending us a donation via paypal. We got bandwidth to buy & audiological goodness to dispense. We will also get a percentage of your Amazon purchase through this link OR you can send us a few and get us a pint!

10 comments
kristenfilipic
kristenfilipic

I wonder if this was getting it backwards.  Is the problem that "the world" (at least in the West) is largely what the Church has made it?  "The world" is our own doing?  Well sort of but it seems more accurate to state that there won't ever be any pristine "the Church" as a contrast because we are all a bunch of broken sinful people and won't ever keep "the world" at bay because "the world" is still in us.  Still in me.

My retreat spot of choice for the last few years has been a Cistercian (Trappist) monastery so I've been thinking about Bernard of Clairvaux a fair amount.  Here is someone who wrote hymns we still sing today (and we should!) who wrote about the love of God in ways that make me weep -- and who also called for the Crusades in ways that make my blood run cold.  If Bernard got something that massive that wrong, I'm guessing I have a whole whole whole lot of "The World" in me too.

Chris Roe
Chris Roe

I think Bo's question of how we interpret Paul's understanding of culture in a post-christendom world was a good one. In a way it's coming at the passage from the opposite direction. I appreciated what you had to say in response on theology of culture and have been mulling it over through the day. It's a tough one. I certainly struggle with the idea of "church" and feel generally disconnected to what Christian community has become. Attractional churches built around dull Sunday worship services just don't make sense any more... or have I just become too conformed to the world? I've recently been reflecting on 1 kings 19 when a severely depressed and isolated Elijah runs back to the birthplace of his faith on mt horeb and in his vision God is present in the silence after the storm. He repeatedly asks Elijah "why are you here?" and after twice hearing his complaints says (and I paraphrase heavily) go back to where you should be and realise that you are not alone. I think it's a good reminder that running away in the face of a hostile culture is not the best path. Yes, Elijah was required to dramatically challenge the prevailing culture of the day, but Gods message was that he was not doing it alone and the fate of Yahweh' people did not rest with him. His task was to remain faithful where he was and to deal with what was in front of him. I like what NT Wright says in this vein about responding to the "echoes of a voice" that are ingrained in the universe. The idea that the culture around us still hears these echoes and yearns for justice, spirituality, relationships, and beauty. If we seek to engage with culture and serve our community at these points with genuine love and humility then we can be real salt and light. Cloistering ourselves in Christian ghettos and sallying forth every now and again to denounce evil and tell em how-it-aught-to-be only drowns out this voice and reduce the church to clashing cymbals and blaring horns.

L Callid Keefe-Perry
L Callid Keefe-Perry

Anything in particular jump out as particularly thoughtful? (Or beer-ful?)

Chris Roe
Chris Roe

Hey guys, spending 8 weeks (!!!?) wresting with Romans 12 in our home group at the moment. Bo v Callid was great beer-for-thought, so thanks!

kristenfilipic
kristenfilipic

Callid, come to (afternoon) church with me!  We aren't all that emerging, I admit, but help shake us up a little.  :)

MichaelDBobo
MichaelDBobo

Part of what makes me on the outermost fringes of TeamJesus is what Kallid addresses as God in the midst of the mess. What does this speak to the character of God that such things happen? I'm struggling with finding comfort in a God who is present but impotent to change what really is happening. I would rather admit no knowledge of God than comment upon inability since it implicates God in the most atrocious evils known to humankind. Any help?

BoSanders
BoSanders moderator

Please DO call that in on the speak pipe ! I would to interact with these thoughts ! -Bo

kristenfilipic
kristenfilipic

(Maybe I should read that for the Speakpipe rather than just commenting here!)

kristenfilipic
kristenfilipic

Okay, should I unpack "Cistercians" and "of course we still sing Bernard of Clairvaux's hymns" and things like that some more, or is this okay?  Sometimes my Catholic roots get away from me and then everyone just stares at me curiously ...