Zombies Empire Bible & Theology: TNT April 22

In this wild & wooly hour, Bo and Tripp cover 4 diverse topics. The first is a blog-post by Bo’s mentor Randy Woodley over at Patheos .

They also cover Tripp’s post at PoMoMusings(@adamw)

In between, the topic of ┬áZombies (via the Walking Dead) and the Hunger Games is introduced by a call from Tripp’s brother, Steven Fuller

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16 comments
joe carson
joe carson

Hi Tripp, Thanks so much for the last 15 minutes or so of the podcast! You organized much of your thinking around some of Lord's Prayer. I organize much of my thelogg/praxis around "do not blame the meat for rotting, blame the lack of salt" (paraphrase of Matt. 5:13) and "love of money is (still and ever more clearly) the root of all evil." So here I am Tripp, an influential member of mankind's largest and most global profession of engineering (because I agitating about the persistent and signifcant defiriencies in the scope and implemenation of `code of ethics for engineers'- the secular `creed' of my profession) and the federal civil service (because I am agitating about persistent and significant deficiiencies in the interpretation and application the "merit system principles," its foundational values), in year 2012 where we each recount, at some length, the "victims of our own success" problems mankind collectively faces. So, where is God's will in it? What is your prophetic voice of what mankind needs to do, with Christians, via their work and witness (including much `sufferring for righteousness' sake" as part of being "salt and light" ), in the vanguard to reach year 2100 with desirable societies? Take it to next level with some specificity, please.

Nate
Nate

One mo' thing: Thanks for the nod to the CHP! :D

Nate
Nate

Listened to this podcast on the way to work this morning. The most interesting part was the discussion of "niche" theologies versus "the grown-up table." I likewise struggle with the tension between the concept of an academic discipline and the histories of power that inform such concepts. On one hand, an ideology that denies the validity of "Theology" as opposed to "Feminist Theology" or "Black Theology" really has given up the framework in which one can meaningfully complain that the seats at the "Theology Table" are denied them. After all, if there is only "European-American Theology," and folks from that table can't practice "Black Theology," then a complaint that "Black Theology" people should be invited to the "European-American Theology" table seems like a nonsensical request. Okay. I just confused myself there. Let me try again: I prefer to think of Black Theology and Chinese Theology and Base-Community Theology and other such endeavors as part of a larger, chaotic-but-intelligible-in-retrospect picture called Theology. I think that there are good reasons within that big picture called Theology to invite difference, but I don't think that there's any easy a priori way to distinguish between co-optation and dialectical engagement. Like theology taken more broadly, such things are always intelligible in retrospect but seldom predictable. In other words, it's conversations like this one that make me glad I'm over in the English department, where one can do theology without worrying nearly as much about such things. :)

Tripp Fuller
Tripp Fuller

@dmf enjoyed the Eugene Thacker interview. the thesis is pretty interesting. have you read the book?

dmf
dmf

sorry about the filter, here is the intro from that site: Eugene Thacker talks to Anne Strainchamps about his book, "In the Dust of This Planet: Horror of Philosophy, Volume 1." In his book, Thacker argues that our world is increasingly unthinkable and that the horror genre can help us, since horror and philosophy have a lot in common.

DW
DW

Just listened to the podcast. That was #$%^ awesome!! Thanks guys - you rock!

Bo Sanders
Bo Sanders

dmf - we appreciate your contribution! If you could add some explanation or introduction to the links you post, that would be great. (also the filter thinks it is spam if you only post a link with nothing else). Give us a tease or a preview for this one? You clearly thought enough of it to put it up :) I am interested! -Bo

Matteo Masiello
Matteo Masiello

Both of the explanations for the human predicament are simply explanations. They presuppose the reality of a God, though. If our sinfulness is relationship, it still fails to make God known to us. He still created us broken. If God is sovereign of all and knows all, why isn't He responsibly for anything? And if He is, then, well why shouldn't He clean up the mess? Why not scrap the whole thing and start over, which scripture implies that God does. Why then should God be worthy of attention, if He is so prone to mistakes like we are?

Bo Sanders
Bo Sanders

Matteo - thank you for writing in. I have a couple of thoughts for you 1) what if the narrative that you have employed to frame you thoughts here is flawed? You won't find too many people on this site who say that god is 'sovereign' in the way that you use it here. We question words like 'almighty' and 'omni-potent'. The notion that god acts unilaterally or coercively needs to be revisited and probably renovated 2) books like Brian Mclaren's a new Kind of Christianity, Elizabeth Johnson's She who IS and John Cobb's Process Perspectives II all do this is various ways (evangelical, catholic, mainline respectively) Check out this Cobb quote: process theologians believe that the God revealed in Jesus' person and teaching is best understood in terms of love rather than of controlling power. This does not mean that God is powerless but that God's power is not coercive. We often say that God is persuasive, and that is correct. It may be still better to say that God's power is expressed in empowering creatures and giving them freedom as well as in calling them to express that freedom in love. You are right in one sense Matteo - IF God is the way that you describe THEN 'he' would not be worthy of much attention. But what if the whole framework that you are utilizing to build the case is flimsy or rotten to the core? Would you be open to different way of proceeding? -Bo

Matteo Masiello
Matteo Masiello

Bo, I get where you're coming from. I am into process and haven't shed my orthodox skin yet, which is why I ask questions like this to all types of Christians. You're the first person to give me a sensible reply.

dmf
dmf

hey Bo, I appreciate that there is a difference that makes a difference between a sort of marxist-like politics of say C.West (to be fair to him he has a sense pf the tragic that doesn't make it into his advocacy work with Smiley) and that of most mainline protestants (or even the more magical positive-thinkers like Osteen and the rest of Oprah's crew) who have a kind of neo-liberal gospel of prosperity, but the underlying logic/anthropology is the same that thru our adaptive capacities we can overcome our all too human natures/limitations to create a kind of earthly paradise, to be in right relation with creation. It would be interesting to know if C.West has some sense of life apart from this mortal coil, does anyone know if he addresses this?

dmf
dmf

TF, sounds like the "prophetic"/critical theology is just the "therapeutic" on a larger scale of social engineering and not really a different logic, and not so modern but more a part of a long history of adaptation to life on earth that doesn't really yet take finitude/mortality seriously. What would it mean to think theology with the knowledge that life on earth is a time-limited affair be it by solar death or otherwise? in other news: http://www.newappsblog.com/2012/04/very-nice-gutting-ny-times-piece-on-the-sermon-on-the-mount.html#more

Bo Sanders
Bo Sanders

DMF, I will let Tripp answer the second part of your comment but I just wanted to chime in on the first. When you think of prophetic think of Cornell West or Jeremiah Wright. When you think of therapeutic think of Joel Osteen. Definitely not doing the same thing only on a different scale :) -Bo

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