Bootlegged Christianity with Philip Clayton, Jack Caputo, Bill Mallonee, Peter Rollins, & Jay Bakker

Here’s a little Easter egg for all the Homebrewed Christianity Deacons to pop open!  It’s a little 3-d experience…a bootlegged version of the Homebrewed Christianity 3-D event at Soularize.  Since we couldn’t get access to the sound board we couldn’t get a better recording but thanks be to Bo who has edited the event down an hour and EQ-ed the speakers so you can make out what they are saying. If you want more 3-D excitement just get ready for Jack Caputo’s ‘what is radical theology?’ 3-D experience & Philip Clayton’s ‘Predicament of Belief’ show.  Both of those WE ran the sound system and they sound like gold!  IN ORDER TO GET THEM you need to subscribe to the Theology Nerd Throwdown podcast feed (iTunes link in the Logo below) which will be separate from the Homebrewed Christianity Podcast feed in two weeks.

This podcast begins with Jack Caputo & Philip Clayton wrestling with religion and Christainity.  Then Peter Rollins starts to insurrect things and Jay Bakker helps us get our preaching legs underneath us. The podcast ends with the music we used to begin the live event…Jesus and my favorite song writer….BILL MALLONEE.

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Join Brian McLaren, Doug Pagitt, Bernice Powell Jackson, Myself, & others as we explore the connection of ecology, incarnation and the interconnectedness of all. April 19-20 in St. Petersburg, Florida for the A Sustainable Faith Conference. Join me the day before for a cigar, brew, convo. on Hell, & a discount for the event. Sunday I will be preaching at the Missio Dei.

 

 

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6 comments
Tim Roberts
Tim Roberts

Thanks for all the great work you're doing (and fun you seem to be having...) Been listening now for a few months. Great to know I'm not alone in the act of brewing.... :O) Cheers Tim

Jeremy
Jeremy

Agreed, that Epiphanies of Darkness is quite dense. However, I found it much more engaging (especially as someone interested in psychoanalysis), and I'll admit being a bit disappointed in Desiring Theology. MCT's Altarity also was one of my favorites, although I'm disappointed that he moved away from religion over the last decade. I imagine he would have some interesting criticisms of Caputo's appropriation of Derrida.

dmf
dmf

@J, EofD is the deeper end of the pool so I usually recommend DT as a way in, but yes lots of background philo at work there, same really as for understanding Caputo, probably not nearly enough philo taught in seminaries these days for folks to really grasp what is at stake in these sort of texts. Erring is also quite good, MCT was a prophet on the wallstreet as casino disaster that passes for our economy and all too often our faith. @TF Winquist is the pivotal figure for the pomo-theo movement, as for preaching Jack's work it might be better to try and teach folks to pay attention to what Calls them and how they respond (and in their own mortal ways fall short) than to try and "nutshell" his concepts. http://slought.org/content/11036

Tripp Fuller
Tripp Fuller

I haven't read Winquist....it is now on my wish list!

Jeremy
Jeremy

Winquist is brilliant and dense, and Epiphanies of Darkness is also a real gem along with MCT's Erring. These books should be re-read by radical theologians who better want to undrestand what happened between Altizer and Caputo.

dmf
dmf

thanks for this, obviously I'm biased but it seems to me that Jack is much more careful about starting with what is at hand (not suprising given his background in phenomenology) whereas Philip here seems more given to speculation, that said I'm not sure that Jack has really taken into consideration the potentially all too human aspect/genealogy of terms/concepts/desires like Justice and Democracy, is anyone teaching/reading Charles Winquist's Desiring Theology anymore?

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